Saturday, November 17, 2012

Chesnut Changers:  Those Raked Leaves Are Piled Treasure

I love these updates from Chesnut Charter's Ecology Club, the Chesnut Changers.  If you would like to follow their blog, click here and enter your email information in the appropriate field.

This Thanksgiving season as brightly colored leaves fall from the trees, instead of thinking of them as a nuisance that you’ve got to gather up and put curbside, why not see them for the free resource they really are? Decomposed leaves are excellent mulch and all-purpose soil amendment for your flowers, lawn, favorite plants and vegetable gardens. Light and spongy, leaf mold compost has lots of air pockets, which encourage worms and other beneficial organisms to live in your garden soil. It is also slightly acidic, which can balance a pH problem in your vegetable garden if your soil is too alkaline (your pH is near 8 and you want to bring it closer to the 6.5 – 7 range).

At our November PTA Clean and Beautiful workday, Chesnut family volunteers and Chesnut Changer students joined forces to collect more than a dozen bags of leaves destined to be next year’s leaf mold compost. Meanwhile, Chesnut Garden Leader Carissa Malone opened eight bags from last year’s compost project, adding the finished leaf mold to the cabbage and garlic beds.

So doing, we kicked off a new Chesnut tradition: annual leaf mold composting to feed our school garden! Taking the abundance of our local renewable resources (fallen leaves from the school’s front lawn), and converting them into a soil conditioner for our veggie garden is a great example of a self-sustaining practice that anyone can adopt. Here’s how we do it:

Click here to read the remainder of the blog entry.

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