Friday, December 15, 2017

Reporter: Dunwoody Study Looks at Replacing 1,900 Apartments
How Would This Affect Dunwoody Cluster Schools?

Dunwoody study looks at replacing 1,900 apartments with mixed uses

A city study broadly recommending the replacement of some older apartment complexes - home to nearly 1,900 households - with mixed-use projects was reviewed at a Dec. 5 meeting. The study of the Peachtree Industrial Boulevard area includes apartment complexes that the city once controversially targeted for replacement with a sports complex.
Disclaimers from the article: 

McLeod said no developers have approached the city yet about redeveloping any property in the study area.
At the Dec. 5 meeting, Councilmember Terry Nall tried to quell some fears that the city wants to redevelop the area.
“Let me make it clear,” he said, “the city is not a developer. This is the development guide plan,” Nall said.

My comments:  I understand the need for future planning for our city.  I support this. However, I am uncomfortable with the erasure of diversity that these plans would bring to Dunwoody.  I believe in and support the diversity of our public schools. 

I hope the City of Dunwoody would insist on the retention of affordable housing.

Note to developers and City of Dunwoody officials…. do not be Brookhaven and insult my (and others) intelligence by maintaining that a $300,000 town home is “affordable housing”.

The following chart is taken from data supplied by the Planning Department of the DeKalb County School District.  I hope I have correctly identified the affected apartment complexes and their feeder elementary schools.


Apartment Complex
Elementary School Feeder
# of students potentially displaced


 ES
MS
HS
Dunwoody Glen
Hightower
254
114
119
Lacota
Hightower
54
33
43
Peachtree Place North
Kingsley
166
73
79
Dunwoody Village
Chesnut
97
47
66

  • Overcrowding at Peachtree Charter MS and Dunwoody HS would be reduced, though not alleviated.
  • The enrollment at Chesnut Elementary and Kingsley Elementary would be so low that neither of these schools would be viable as stand-alone schools without redistricting.
  • The enrollment at Hightower, while lower than its current capacity level, would still be viable as a stand-alone school.  

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